WHAT IS A SERVICE ANIMAL?

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. 

Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.

ADA REQUIREMENTS

For more information, visit ADA website
This definition does not affect or limit the broader definition of “assistance animal” under the Fair Housing Act or the broader definition of “service animal” under the Air Carrier Access Act.

TRAINING PROCCESS

DOCTOR’S LETTER 

Prescription of a service animal to provide tasks for your disability

 EVALUATE YOUR DOG 

During the evaluation, the evaluator can identify if your dog has the necessary requirements to perform the tasks

OBEDIENCE TRAINING

Some disabilities will require more advanced training and tasks that your dog can be trained to do for you

PUBLIC ACCESS TRAINING

We teach your dog to be neutral in a public setting

SPECIFIC TASK TRAINING

Tasks must be directly related with the person’s disability 

C.G.C

Canine good citizen, advanced canine good citizen tests and service animal test

Rux

Mason

Atlas

Toby

You can`t add more product in compare